Scientology: The Marks of Religion

Frank K. Flinn, Ph.D.

Adjunct Professor

in Religious Studies

Washington University

Saint Louis, Missouri

U.S.A.



II. SYSTEM OF BELIEFS

 

     In terms of the Scientology belief system, there exists a vast amount of religious material through which the scholar must wend her or his way. Furthermore, the scholar needs to be sensitive to the fact that Scientology, like every other religious tradition in history, is organic and has undergone and is undergoing an evolution. One can mention such key scriptures by L. Ron Hubbard as Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health, Scientology: The Fundamentals of Thought, The Phoenix Lectures, plus the voluminous training and management manuals, but this would only be the tip of the iceberg of Scientology scriptures. Central to everything are the writings of L. Ron Hubbard, who is the sole source of inspiration for all Scientology doctrines pertaining to auditing and training.

     My interviews with Scientologists and my study of its scriptures have shown that members of the Church adhere to a basic creed, in which they confess that mankind is basically good, that the spirit can be saved and that the healing of both physical and spiritual ills proceeds from the spirit. In full, the Scientology creed states:

     We of the Church believe:

     That all men of whatever race, colour or creed were created with equal rights;

     That all men have inalienable rights to their own religious practices and their performance;

     That all men have inalienable rights to their own lives;

     That all men have inalienable rights to their sanity;

     That all men have inalienable rights to their own defense;

     That all men have inalienable rights to conceive, choose, assist or support their own organizations, churches and governments;

     That all men have inalienable rights to think freely, to talk freely, to write freely their own opinions and to counter or utter or write upon the opinions of others;

     That all men have inalienable rights to the creation of their own kind;

     That the souls of men have the rights of men;

     That the study of the mind and the healing of mentally caused ills should not be alienated from religion or condoned in non-religious fields;

     And that no agency less than God has the power to suspend or set aside these rights, overtly or covertly.

     And we of the Church believe:

     That man is basically good;

     That he is seeking to survive;

     That his survival depends upon himself and upon his fellows and his attainment of brotherhood with the universe.

     And we of the Church believe that the laws of God forbid Man:

     To destroy his own kind;

     To destroy the sanity of another;

     To destroy or enslave another’s soul;

     To destroy or reduce the survival of one’s companions or one’s group.

     And we of the Church believe that the spirit can be saved and that the spirit alone may save or heal the body.

 



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